Phase 1 - Strength Training for Runners

7 Weeks / 3 Days per Week / Intermediate

0 ratings
Phase 1 - Strength Training for Runners

Phase 1 - Strength Training for Runners

7 Weeks / 3 Days per Week / Intermediate

0 ratings

Phase 1 - Strength Training for Runners

7 Weeks / 3 Days per Week / Intermediate

0 ratings
  • Day 1
  • Day 2
  • Day 3

Notes for Week 1, Day 1

*Be sure to read the workout plan summary (the tab below entitled, "summary")

There is no distance noted because each person varies in their training level. The goal is to train within the 50% to 85% HRR (Heart Rate Reserve) range for 30-60 minutes.

Heart rate reserve is the difference between your maximal heart rate and your resting heart rate. To find your HRR, you can use a simple formula which uses the age-predicted maximal heart rate (APMHR) equation.

AMPHR = 220 - Age

HRR = APMHR - RHR

*The best time to take your resting heart rate (RHR) is first thing in the morning before getting out of bed.

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Exercise Sets Distance Time Reps Weight Rest
Quads / Beginner
1 sets, 00:40:00
1 -- 00:40:00 --:--
  • normal
  • superset
  • alternate
  • circuit
  • Primary
  • Secondary

Muscles Worked

  • Primary
  • Secondary

Workout Plan Summary

The goal of this plan is to increase VO2max (oxygen uptake) in the trainee to build a strong aerobic base before beginning the resistance training portion of the workout program. For those who are currently involved in an aerobic training program and have already built up an aerobic base, they ca... more

The goal of this plan is to increase VO2max (oxygen uptake) in the trainee to build a strong aerobic base before beginning the resistance training portion of the workout program. For those who are currently involved in an aerobic training program and have already built up an aerobic base, they can opt to bypass this portion of the program and begin the strength training phase.

You may be wondering why this phase of the workout plan is focusing solely on aerobic endurance when the title of the program is strength training for runners. Research has shown that there are positive effects to incorporating both resistance training and aerobic endurance in a complete training program, but completely both simultaneously leads to less than optimal results.

Studies have shown that aerobic and resistance training at the same time (concurrent training) does not yield the same results as if you were to do them separately. Increases in strength gains are blunted while VO2 increases as if you were only training aerobically. Thus, aerobic capacity will increase as if you were training solely for aerobic endurance, but you will not see the full benefits of your strength training workouts. Not only were maximum strength gains reduced, but reductions in muscle girth gains, specific speed, and power related performances were noted as well. One positive aspect to concurrent training was the improvement in low-intensity aerobic endurance.

No one wants to put in their best effort only to see less than optimal results. This plan will maximize what research has shown to be the best route to building strength in runners. The cycle of this program will focus on aerobic training for 7 weeks, then will decrease your aerobic training to a maintenance phase (maintain the improved VO2max), while incorporating resistance training to focus on improving strength for the next 7 weeks (phase 2). Then will alternate and increase your aerobic training and reduce strength training to a maintenance phase. This cycle can continue indefinitely, but will need variations in intensity and exercise selection to spur muscle adaptations and avoid plateaus.

*Be sure to read the notes under each workout within the plan

Intermittent Pace/Tempo Workout

Notes for Week 1, Day 2

This workout will involve short periods of running at your goal pace (higher than your current pace) with short rest periods in between each running bout. The goal is to train at the higher percentages of your HRR (50%-85%) that was discussed in workout #1. Aim to train closer to the 85% than 50%.

Rest 60 seconds between each running bout.

For more experienced runners, perform steady pace/tempo training. This involves one long running bout at the desired pace.

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Exercise Sets Distance Time Reps Weight Rest
Quads / Beginner
1 sets, 00:03:30
1 -- 00:03:30 --:--
Quads / Beginner
1 sets, 00:03:30
1 -- 00:03:30 --:--
Quads / Beginner
1 sets, 00:03:30
1 -- 00:03:30 --:--
--
--
1 sets, 00:03:30
1 -- 00:03:30 --:--
--
--
1 sets, 00:03:30
1 -- 00:03:30 --:--
--
--
1 sets, 00:03:30
1 -- 00:03:30 --:--
  • normal
  • superset
  • alternate
  • circuit
  • Primary
  • Secondary

Muscles Worked

  • Primary
  • Secondary

Workout Plan Summary

The goal of this plan is to increase VO2max (oxygen uptake) in the trainee to build a strong aerobic base before beginning the resistance training portion of the workout program. For those who are currently involved in an aerobic training program and have already built up an aerobic base, they ca... more

The goal of this plan is to increase VO2max (oxygen uptake) in the trainee to build a strong aerobic base before beginning the resistance training portion of the workout program. For those who are currently involved in an aerobic training program and have already built up an aerobic base, they can opt to bypass this portion of the program and begin the strength training phase.

You may be wondering why this phase of the workout plan is focusing solely on aerobic endurance when the title of the program is strength training for runners. Research has shown that there are positive effects to incorporating both resistance training and aerobic endurance in a complete training program, but completely both simultaneously leads to less than optimal results.

Studies have shown that aerobic and resistance training at the same time (concurrent training) does not yield the same results as if you were to do them separately. Increases in strength gains are blunted while VO2 increases as if you were only training aerobically. Thus, aerobic capacity will increase as if you were training solely for aerobic endurance, but you will not see the full benefits of your strength training workouts. Not only were maximum strength gains reduced, but reductions in muscle girth gains, specific speed, and power related performances were noted as well. One positive aspect to concurrent training was the improvement in low-intensity aerobic endurance.

No one wants to put in their best effort only to see less than optimal results. This plan will maximize what research has shown to be the best route to building strength in runners. The cycle of this program will focus on aerobic training for 7 weeks, then will decrease your aerobic training to a maintenance phase (maintain the improved VO2max), while incorporating resistance training to focus on improving strength for the next 7 weeks (phase 2). Then will alternate and increase your aerobic training and reduce strength training to a maintenance phase. This cycle can continue indefinitely, but will need variations in intensity and exercise selection to spur muscle adaptations and avoid plateaus.

*Be sure to read the notes under each workout within the plan

Long Slow Distance Workout

Notes for Week 1, Day 3

Long slow distance training involves training an intensity normally used so that the duration of the workout is longer. One example, would be a person capable of running a 6 minute mile/pace would reduce to an 8 minute/mile pace for a longer distance.

One way judge if you are at an appropriate intensity is whether you can carry on a short conversation while exercising. You should be able to talk without becoming short of breath. Again, for most people the goal is train in the 50% to 85% HRR training zone, this may not be possible for those who are out of shape.

To determine the correct duration of the exercise (can last anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 hours depending on the person), once your heart rate begins to increase without an increase in workload that is when the session is over.

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Online Workout Tracking
Step-By-Step Video Tutorials
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Join Today!
Exercise Sets Distance Time Reps Weight Rest
Quads / Beginner
1 sets, 01:00:00
1 -- 01:00:00 --:--
  • normal
  • superset
  • alternate
  • circuit
  • Primary
  • Secondary

Muscles Worked

  • Primary
  • Secondary

Workout Plan Summary

The goal of this plan is to increase VO2max (oxygen uptake) in the trainee to build a strong aerobic base before beginning the resistance training portion of the workout program. For those who are currently involved in an aerobic training program and have already built up an aerobic base, they ca... more

The goal of this plan is to increase VO2max (oxygen uptake) in the trainee to build a strong aerobic base before beginning the resistance training portion of the workout program. For those who are currently involved in an aerobic training program and have already built up an aerobic base, they can opt to bypass this portion of the program and begin the strength training phase.

You may be wondering why this phase of the workout plan is focusing solely on aerobic endurance when the title of the program is strength training for runners. Research has shown that there are positive effects to incorporating both resistance training and aerobic endurance in a complete training program, but completely both simultaneously leads to less than optimal results.

Studies have shown that aerobic and resistance training at the same time (concurrent training) does not yield the same results as if you were to do them separately. Increases in strength gains are blunted while VO2 increases as if you were only training aerobically. Thus, aerobic capacity will increase as if you were training solely for aerobic endurance, but you will not see the full benefits of your strength training workouts. Not only were maximum strength gains reduced, but reductions in muscle girth gains, specific speed, and power related performances were noted as well. One positive aspect to concurrent training was the improvement in low-intensity aerobic endurance.

No one wants to put in their best effort only to see less than optimal results. This plan will maximize what research has shown to be the best route to building strength in runners. The cycle of this program will focus on aerobic training for 7 weeks, then will decrease your aerobic training to a maintenance phase (maintain the improved VO2max), while incorporating resistance training to focus on improving strength for the next 7 weeks (phase 2). Then will alternate and increase your aerobic training and reduce strength training to a maintenance phase. This cycle can continue indefinitely, but will need variations in intensity and exercise selection to spur muscle adaptations and avoid plateaus.

*Be sure to read the notes under each workout within the plan

31 person started this plan

Workout Goals

  • Improve Cardio

Equipment Needed

  • Treadmill

No Reviews yet.

Phase 1 - Strength Training for Runners

31 person started this plan

Workout Goals

  • Improve Cardio

Equipment Needed

  • Treadmill